Vero Beach Magazine Excerpt – Local Flavor – Nov 2012

Linda Hart is a licensed poultry farmer and entrepreneur who has started growing pumpkins on her Crazy Hart Farm in Fellsmere. Her pumpkins are heirloom Seminoles, one of the oldest varieties grown in Florida. “I started experimenting with the Seminoles for personal consumption and they have really taken off,” she says. She will likely have plenty to sell at the Oceanside Farmers Market on Ocean Drive this fall.

“The Seminole is very good-tasting – sweeter than other varieties of pumpkin – and it is an indigenous fruit that has been growing around here for hundreds of years. I think it is important to bring back the native foods of the area.”

Linda’s pumpkins grow on vines on the ground, but she says that Florida pioneers were surprised to see them climbing up trees where they picked the pumpkins high off the ground. “The Indians would girdle a tree with the vines to grow the pumpkins so they didn’t have to pick through any foliage to harvest the fruit.”

Linda is also experimenting with ways to cook her pumpkins. For instance, the flowered blooms of the fruit can be battered and deep fried. “Basically, pumpkins are simple to cook. Just cut them in half, scrape the seeds out and put them face down in a pan and bake them. If you want to be traditional, you can make pumpkin bread and fry it. This is what the Miccosukee and the Seminole Indians still do today for their powwows.”

In addition to their adaptability, pumpkins and other winter squashes have a long shelf life and will keep for months if stored in a cool, dry place between 55 degrees and 60 degrees.

VBM_Local-Flavor-NOV2012

 

Full Article (pdf)

Though winter squash is now plentiful, many cooks ignore this veggie’s edible pleasures.
DON’T SQUANDER THE SQUASH!
BY MARY BETH VALLAR
PHOTOGRAPHY BY DENISE RITCHIE

Field to Feast – The Local Palate – October 2012

Field to Feast: Recipes Celebrating Florida Farmers, Chefs, and Artisans (2012)

Pam Brandon, Katie Farmand, and Heather McPherson have compiled a beautiful book of Florida’s bounty that feels like a drive through the coastal woodlands and the country roads of the Sunshine State. Full of portraits of the people who grow and cook the plethora of foodstuffs Florida offers. Field to Feast is at once a travel companion, coffee-table book, and useful cookbook. The recipes are diverse: Chefs James and Julie Petrakis of The Ravenous Pig offer an Alsatian Tart with Spring Peach Salad, which contrasts nicely with Brined and Herb Butter-Basted Turkey from Crazy Hart Ranch in Fellsmere. It’s a delicious and unique portrayal of a thriving culinary landscape.

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thelocalpalate

Narragansett Heritage Turkeys Facts

If you wanted to know more about Narragansett Heritage Turkeys, you can read more here at this link to a Livestock Conservancy page.

SOME BASIC FACTS

Status:
Threatened

Use:
Meat

Egg Color:
Pale cream to medium brown with spotting

Egg Size:
Large

Market Weight:
14 -23 lbs

Temperament:
Highly dependent on selection by breeder, Some select for aggressive, others docile.

 

That’s it for now, hope to hear from all of you soon!